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Exhibition:
JUST YELL: (UN)TOLD
Cheryl Pope

Exhibition dates: January 15 – March 11, 2016

JUST YELL: (UN)TOLD

In JUST YELL: (UN)TOLD, Pope uses a sports metaphor and collaborations from inner city youth in Chicago to create an arena to address gun violence and the perpetrators and victims. For years, Pope’s work has dealt with sports as a metaphor for artistic training and spectacle. In particular, her practice has engaged in the public/private tension that is at the heart of both sports and art practice.

In her current exhibition at CUAC she covers the entire gallery floor with dirt and fosters the growth of grass to create the lines of a basketball court. When the viewers enter the space, they are literally standing on the court as they view the championship pendants on the walls and the yearbook and letterman’s patches that exist as art objects. Cheerleaders used to be yell-leaders, cheering-yelling. The pendants contain language given to her anonymously by Chicago youth about their personal experience growing up. Standing on the court, the viewer is confronted with her role as a “player” in the context of race, gender, and economic related inequalities, especially in the context of gun violence in the inner city.

Cheryl Pope is represented by Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, Spinello Projects in Miami, and Galeria Bianconi in Milan. She received a BFA in Studio Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and she received an MFA in Fashion, Body, and Garment from SIAC where she currently teaches. She has received numerous awards for her art and exhibited internationally. Her work is in the permanent collections of several museums including the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. She is a Golden Gloves Boxer and a boxing instructor in Chicago where she is also actively engaged with the youth there, which has greatly influenced her art over the last few years.

Please see her artist statement that follows:

CHERYL POPE

JUST YELL: (UN)TOLD

JUST YELL is an on-going project that questions and responds to issues of violence and oppression as it affects the identity of the individual and the community. Through direct interactions and on-going conversations within urban communities primarily youth, confessions and stories are collected in the forms of statements, poetry, and protests.

Through a journalistic lens, these truths are then contextualized into sculpture, performance, books, and installations.

The project title JUST YELL, emerges from the history of cheerleading. From 1880-1920, cheerleading was called YELLING. It is used for this project for its complexity, to yell for hope, to yell for peace, to yell in anger, to yell in fear, to yell to be heard, to yell to scare . . . It brings forward the many layers the body experiences in and around these issues while suggesting the simplicity of the act to yell. (UN)TOLD contains a selection of the championship banner series titled A SILENT I. The text on each banner was submitted by Chicago youth from Lindblom Math and Science Career Academy in 2010. Students were invited to submit one truth and one lie about themselves and did not have to mark which was which. From this a selection was then produced into the banner series and first installed in the gymnasium at their school.

JUST YELL: A GUIDE BOOK TO YELLERS contains the voices of over 300 Chicago youth responding to issues of gun violence, its direct impact on their life and what they think needs to be done. Written through a commanding voice, the text functions as a cheer, as a poem, and as a protest. Photographs also document this commanding voice through signs that can be seen as audience directives or protests. This book brings forward the body, the youth, the many that gun violence is affecting. Positioned at the beginning of the book is a yearbook of youth 18 and under killed by Chicago gun violence between 2012-2013. Alongside the victims is a yearbook of the gunmen charged with murder. One will notice the many blank spaces of unknown shooters pointing to cases left unclosed, forgotten, or deleted. In each page, the multitude of effects the epidemic of gun violence provokes can be seen, heard, and felt.

In a new installation, SIGHTLINES 2016, soil covers the entire gallery floor as viewers’ awareness is again called towards the body, in this case the body of the earth. Referencing a line from a poem called Memorial by Audre Lorde “and the rich earth between us shall drink our tears, SIGHTLINES brings forth humanity through smell, touch and sight as the weight of each viewer compresses the loose dirt into a solid surface. Emerging from the soil are lines of wheatgrass, grown in the gallery space and mapping out the lines of a basketball court. Entering the gallery, the viewer enters the playing field, enters the court, and is asked their role as a player in this epidemic issue of gun violence, segregation, and abuse of power.

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Exhibition:
True Love Waits
Maxfield Hegedus & Suhnee Venice
Organized by Michael Thibault

Exhibition dates: January 15 – March 11, 2016


I’ll drown my beliefs
To have your babies
I’ll dress like your niece
And wash your swollen feet

                                                                                                               Just don’t leave
                                                                                                              Don’t leave

I’m not living, I’m just killing time
Your tiny hands, your crazy-kitten smile

                                                                                                              Just don’t leave
                                                                                                              Don’t leave

True love waits
In haunted attics
And true love lives
On lollipops and crisps

                                                                                                               Just don’t leave
                                                                                                              Don’t leave

Maxfield Hegedus & Suhnee Venice both live and work in Los Angeles, CA. This is their second time exhibiting together after having recently participated in Playing Pool With Eggs, curated by Tobias Spichtig at Galerie Bernhard, Zürich, CH. Upcoming exhibitions include participation in a group show at Lodos Contemporary, Mexico City in April, 2016, and a two-person exhibition at Martos LA in June, 2016.

Michael Thibault is a gallerist and art exhibition organizer that lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. His eponymous gallery opened in 2013 and has since been reviewed, featured, or mentioned in the New York Times, Artforum, Flash Art, Text Zur Kunst, Frieze, and Forbes, amongst others. True Love Waits is the first in a series of two-person and small group shows that Michael Thibault will be organizing at exhibition spaces away of his gallery in 2016.